15 rare facts about dogs that only experts know

Did you know that the long-haired German shepherd is actually a genetic mutation? It is not a naturally occurring trait and is therefore not as common as the normal German Shepherd coat. Long hair can make a dog more prone to tangles and tangling, so daily grooming is a must.

These dogs are also at a higher risk of developing skin problems due to the long coat that traps moisture on the skin. Despite the additional maintenance required, many people find long hair simply beautiful.

If you are considering a long-haired German Shepherd, be prepared to spend a little extra time brushing and combing. But if you’re willing to do it, you’ll be rewarded with a beautiful, regal-looking dog.

Lesser known facts about the Longhaired German Shepherd:

Did you know there is more than one type of German Shepherd? While the Longhaired German Shepherd is a less popular breed, they are still impressive dogs. There are many things that people don’t know about long-haired German Shepherds. For example, they are actually a different breed than their short-haired counterparts. They also have a lot of energy and require a lot of care. Below are 15 lesser known facts about these beautiful dogs.

Long-haired German Shepherd

1. Long-haired German Shepherds are not recognized by the AKC

The American Kennel Club (AKC) recognizes only two types of German Shepherds, the standard coat and the short coat variety. This means that any dog ​​with a coat that falls somewhere between these two extremes is not technically considered a German Shepherd according to the AKC.

2. The long-haired gene is a mutation

The long-haired gene is actually a mutation, which is why it is not as common as the coat of a regular German Shepherd. The mutation occurred naturally and is not the result of deliberate breeding.

3. They require more care than other German Shepherds

Long hair can make a dog more prone to tangles and tangling, so daily grooming is a must. These dogs are also at a higher risk of developing skin problems due to the long coat that traps moisture on the skin.

4. They may be prone to ear infections

Long fur around the ears can create an ideal environment for bacteria to grow, which can lead to ear infections. Be sure to check your dog’s ears regularly and clean them as needed to prevent problems.

5. They are not recommended for hot climates

Long-haired German Shepherds are not suited to hot climates because of their long fur. The fur can actually trap heat on the skin, which can lead to discomfort or even heatstroke. If you live in a warm climate, it’s best to stick with the short-haired variety.

6. They are more prone to allergies

Long fur can also trap dust, pollen and other allergens on the skin, which can cause problems for allergy sufferers. If your dog is prone to allergies, you may want to consider a different breed.

7. They require a lot of physical exercise

Long-haired German Shepherds are high-energy dogs that require a lot of physical exercise. A daily walk or run is a must and they will also enjoy playing fetch or going for a swim. If you don’t have time to devote to regular exercise, this may not be the right breed for you.

8. They make great family dogs

Despite their high energy levels, Longhaired German Shepherds are gentle and loving dogs that make great family pets. They protect their family and are great watchdogs, but they also get along well with children.

9. They need mental stimulation

In addition to physical exercise, these dogs need plenty of mental stimulation to stay happy and healthy. Logic toys, scent games and training exercises are great ways to keep their minds active.

10. They need a lot of socialization

Longhaired German Shepherds are social dogs that need a lot of time around people to stay happy. They should be well socialized from a young age to ensure they are comfortable around new people and situations.

11. They may be prone to certain health problems

Like all breeds, long-haired German Shepherds are prone to certain health problems. Some of the most common include hip and elbow dysplasia, allergies, and skin problems.

12. They have a lifespan of 10-12 years

With proper care, a long-haired German Shepherd can enjoy a lifespan of 10-12 years. That’s about the average for large breeds, but it’s important to remember that individual dogs can live shorter or longer depending on their health and lifestyle.

13. They are not suitable for everyone

Longhaired German Shepherds are high-energy, high-maintenance dogs that are not for everyone. If you are looking for an inconspicuous pet, this is not the breed for you.

14. They need an experienced owner

These dogs also need an experienced owner who is willing to commit to regular exercise, grooming and socialization. If you are not up to the challenge, you may want to consider a different breed.

15. They make great companions

Despite their high energy levels, Longhaired German Shepherds are loving and loyal dogs that make great companions. If you are looking for a dog that will be by your side through thick and thin, this is the breed for you.

Although long-haired German Shepherds are not as popular as their short-haired cousins, they are still impressive dogs.

Did you know that long-haired German Shepherds were actually the original type of German Shepherd? Short-haired German Shepherds only became popular after World War I, when soldiers stationed in Germany brought home dogs of this breed.

Long-haired German Shepherds are also more prone to health problems than their short-haired counterparts. This is because their long fur is more susceptible to dirt and grime, which can lead to skin infections. Additionally, their long hair can make it difficult for them to cool down in hot weather.

Despite these challenges, long-haired German Shepherds are still loyal and loving companions. If you are considering adding one of these dogs to your family, be sure to do your research and find a reputable breeder.

Over the years, the popularity of long-haired German Shepherds has declined. This is probably due to the fact that they are more prone to health problems and require more care than their short-haired counterparts. However, if you are willing to take on the challenge of owning a long-haired German Shepherd, you will be rewarded with a loyal and loving companion.

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